leadership development

Choosing a credible partner to support your diversity and inclusion goals

Many companies now recognise that progressing their diversity and inclusion goals may require specialist support along the way. But how do you choose a credible external partner?

It helps if you can first articulate what you're trying to achieve, and why that's important to your organisation. For example, are you wanting to encourage diversity of thought to lift innovation? Is gender-balanced and culturally diverse leadership important to reflect your customers?

We recognise that identifying those objectives is not always straightforward either, and engaging a consultancy can help at this early stage.

We know you want to be confident about the quality, credibility, and experience of the consultancy you choose as your D & I partner, so we've put together some questions you might like to ask prospective consulting firms to get the best outcome from your investment.

Some are about experience in developing strategies and embedding inclusion; others are about approaches to leadership development.

Questions to ask potential partners - developing strategies and embedding inclusion

1. What skills and experience does your consultancy offer to support diversity, foster inclusion and reduce bias in organisational cultures?

2. What is your consultancy’s evidence-based knowledge of the business case for diversity and inclusion and global best-practice, particularly relating to creating strategic linkages with business strategy and objectives?

3. What practical experience do your consultants have in embedding strategic programs of work for diversity and inclusion across a range of organisation types and sizes? 

4. What’s your experience in identifying diversity challenges and organisational biases? What analytical methodologies do you use? 

5. How do you go about developing a customised strategy to progress diversity and inclusion?

6. What are the types of diversity and inclusion-related cultural challenges and opportunities you typically identify? Does this differ across industries and what have the impacts of your previously recommended client strategies been for their business?

7. What’s your experience in navigating organisational resistance to diversity and inclusion efforts?

8. What tools do you offer to build the capability of leaders in making diversity and inclusion part of the overall business culture and how do you know these work? 

Questions to ask potential partners - leadership development

Helping leaders to build awareness and skills to lead inclusively and challenging bias requires facilitators who are experienced in dealing sensitively with the range of issues usually raised in discussions about diversity and inclusion in companies. It's important that, along with a passion or interest in the topic, facilitators have skills to lead meaningful conversations and encourage participants  to reflect on their responses and behaviours in real time.

You might have someone in the company who's passionate about safety, but that doesn't automatically make them an effective facilitator to influence leadership mindsets and behaviours. It's the same for diversity and inclusion. 

Along with a passion or interest in the topic, it's important facilitators have skills to lead meaningful conversations and encourage participants to reflect on their responses and behaviours in real time.

Along with a passion or interest in the topic, it's important facilitators have skills to lead meaningful conversations and encourage participants to reflect on their responses and behaviours in real time.

Some questions you might like to ask potential partners are:

1. How do you apply adult learning concepts in the design and delivery of your workshops?

2. What learning outcomes do you aim for in your workshops and how do you know you’ve achieved this?

3. How do you facilitate open and meaningful conversations about diversity, particularly with participants who may be resistant to the concepts being discussed?

4. How do you handle questions that may be sensitive for some in the group? Can you give examples of when this has occurred and what your response has been?

5. How do you recommend organisations cement learnings beyond the workshop?

6. What tools do you use to coach leaders to build inclusive leadership capability?

If you'd like more information about the types of services provided by Diversity Partners, please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au or call our office on 1800 571 999.

Diversity contributes to better ethical practices

Ethics

Leading and sustaining a successful and ethical business can be a complex game. For some, this can be all the more (seemingly) complex when you bring together people with different backgrounds and perspectives.

However, we now know that well-managed diverse teams lead to greater business benefits, innovation and creativity.

Where some are still connecting the dots is in understanding the positive impact of diverse teams and inclusive behaviours on ethical decision-making and corporate governance. 

Several studies have shown that diversity on boards and in teams brings fresh thinking, increased focus on problem solving, and greater transparency.

As companies plan leadership curriculums for 2018, we think a significant focus on the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making and problem-solving is warranted.

dynamics make a difference

 It's important for leaders to understand the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making.    

 It's important for leaders to understand the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making. 

 

People with different backgrounds bring new information, but what really counts is the dynamics of diverse teams when making decisions.

In a seminal article published in Scientific American, Professor Katherine Phillips from Columbia Business School writes that 'interacting with individuals who are different forces group members to prepare better, to anticipate alternative viewpoints and to expect that reaching consensus will take effort'.

'When we hear dissent from someone who is different to us, it provokes more thought than when it comes from someone who looks like us,' she says.

It's these behavioural dynamics that drive ethical successes and failures, argues Dennis Gentilin, author of The Origins of Ethical Failures and publicly named ‘whistleblower’ in the FX trading scandal that rocked the National Australia Bank in 2004.

Speaking with us at Diversity Partners, Gentilin says 'we need to surround ourselves with diverse opinions to keep ourselves accountable to our standards and values because we can all fall short.'

‘If we surround ourselves with challenging views and create an environment where others feel they can ‘speak up’ then we avoid going down the slippery slope of ethical failure,’ according to Gentilin.

Unfortunately, sometimes it takes a crisis for organisations to fully understand and appreciate the contribution of good diversity and inclusion practices to ethical resilience.

In 2011, one year after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, I joined a global facilitation team for BP’s newly formed Diversity & Inclusion Academy. As a result of this crisis, and following a range of independent studies on the situation, it became clear that decision-making biases (particularly confirmation bias) and the lack of a safety ‘speak up’ culture were among contributing factors to the disaster.

BP subsequently focused on leadership education so that all employees act with greater awareness of core values such as safety, respect and courage, and have awareness and skills to challenge unconscious biases.

Tips to encourage diverse thinking approaches and perspectives

Although we’re all susceptible to forces that make us ignore risks, leaders at all levels of an organisation can take steps that will encourage diversity of thought and potentially reduce ethical risk.

Here's a few tips to get started...

            1. Develop your awareness of cognitive biases. Psychologists and behavioural economists have highlighted many biases that impair our ability to make objective and effective decisions. We all have biases, but we’re often not aware of them playing out in our minds.

Unconscious bias training gives leaders an opportunity to understand how easily our decisions are impacted at work by affinity bias (our natural tendency to gravitate towards ‘people like us’), confirmation bias (our tendency to seek out information that confirms our beliefs and ignore conflicting evidence), and groupthink (where pressure for unanimity overwhelms realistic appraisal of alternative courses of action).

            2. Give teams explicit permission to disagree with you. While seeking feedback from others is essential, some leaders go further by appointing a ‘devil’s advocate’ in meetings to encourage multiple perspectives and normalise challenge. One CEO we know routinely tells colleagues that ‘you have an obligation to disagree with me’.

            3. Engage team members from outside of your regular circle. Inclusive leaders make a concerted effort to understand the experiences of people who are not part of their tight-knit ‘in-group’ and who may feel (unintentionally) excluded from some key decisions.

Simple things such as where you hold meetings and who gets invited to them can make a difference.

Decision making experts emphasise the importance of hearing from people who are ‘cognitively peripheral’ – who have information that is not generally known – rather than having discussions disproportionately influenced by people who are ‘cognitively central’ – who have knowledge that is shared by many members of the group.

Or, as one global organisation advises its leaders, every group needs to ‘hear from the quietest person in the room’.


An earlier version of this article appeared in Leadership Matters, the newsletter of the Institute of Managers and Leaders for Australia and New Zealand in 2016.

If you'd like more information about this topic, or any other resources to help progress diversity and inclusion in your firm, please email us at info@diversitypartners.com.au.

 

When seemingly small things mean so much: inclusive leadership actions

Many of us have probably experienced a thoughtless action at work such as not being introduced in a meeting, being left off an email distribution list, or others taking credit for our work.

By itself, this might seem inconsequential.

But when this happens consistently over time - like a leaky tap - it can leave those on the receiving end feeling isolated and excluded.

It was Professor Mary Rowe of Massachusetts Institute of Technology who coined the term ‘micro-inequities’ in the 1970s to describe small and often unintentional unfairnesses toward those who are perceived as different.

Micro-inequities are often the result of unconscious bias or not understanding cultural differences. They're subtle but erode confidence, explains Australian scientist Dr Jill Rathborne on micro-inequities in the male-dominated world of science for example. 

We all need to be aware, consciously, of these on a day-to-day basis if we’re to create inclusive workplaces of the future.

The good news is that there are many relatively simple things we can do to reduce unconscious bias and micro-inequities. Mary Rowe called these ‘micro-affirmations’: ‘tiny acts of opening doors to opportunity, gestures of inclusion and caring, and graceful acts of listening’.

It might seem obvious, but the impact of these inclusive actions on individuals and team cultures in our workplaces can be very significant. They help everyone feel a greater sense of belonging and reduce unconscious bias.

We all need to be aware, consciously, of micro-inequities on a day-to-day basis if we’re to create inclusive workplaces of the future.

Here's ten inclusive actions (drawing on research and discussions in our leadership workshops) that can make a positive difference to everyday interactions, meetings, and decision-making.

Inclusive interactions

1.    Acknowledge people when you pass them in the office, especially those not part of your ‘in-group’.

2.    Ask for permission before calling someone by a nickname (and think about who has a nickname and who doesn’t).

3.    Ask for the correct pronunciation of an unfamiliar name – make an effort to get it right.

4.    Be mindful that small talk at the start of a meeting may leave some feeling excluded - make an effort to invite everyone into the conversation.

Inclusive meetings

5.    Introduce all people in a meeting with equal level of acknowledgement.

6.    In your team meetings, appoint a devil’s advocate (and make sure to rotate this role) to reduce groupthink.

7.    Be especially attentive to virtual team members who dial into meetings.

8.    Consider when and where a meeting should be held and who is invited, to maximise diversity of thought and perspective.

Inclusive decision-making

9.    Next time you’re making a key decision, actively seek out multiple perspectives (especially those different to your own) to avoid confirmation and sunflower bias.

10.    Use different communication channels to receive input on a project or idea - some team members will be more comfortable providing a follow up email or direct phone call rather than speaking out in a team meeting.

These tips, and many others, are explored in our Inclusive Leadership: Challenging Unconscious Bias workshop for leaders and employees. We'd love to share more with you - please contact us for a chat.

34.jpg