diversity of thinking approaches

New year, new thinking - accelerating progress on diversity

To accelerate diversity and inclusion progress in Australia and New Zealand in 2018, we think it’s important to focus on how your organisation is leveraging diversity of thinking approaches and diversity of background to improve decision-making and organisational performance.

In a recent interview, Dr Katie Spearritt spoke about ways to reduce unconscious biases in decision-making, so we gain the benefits of diversity of thought and background.

Q: Are business leaders getting more serious about diversity of thought?

We’re seeing a growing interest to apply the research on cognitive diversity in the workplace. For example, a CEO of an industry superannuation fund contacted us to explore how bias might be getting in the way of effective decision-making on his team. His team was gender balanced and culturally diverse, and he appreciated the different perspectives that brought.

The CEO wanted to go further, to identify the team's preferred thinking approaches so they could consciously bring different perspectives to decision-making as they launched new products and expanded their market.

Photo: Getty Images

Photo: Getty Images

We’re also seeing more and more focus on the importance of diversity of thought for ethical decision-making and corporate governance. 

Groupthink and confirmation bias have contributed to some big ethical failures in history. That’s why one global resources organisation we’ve worked with explicitly advises its leaders to ‘hear from the quietest person in the room’.

 

Q: Can you share some practical things that leaders can do to encourage different thinking approaches?

Before making a key decision in a meeting, we encourage teams to reflect if they’ve considered a range of different thinking approaches and credible alternatives, as well as unconscious biases that might impact their decision-making.

This usually means consciously slowing down our thinking. ‘Slow thinking’ is a recognised strategy to build inclusive leadership capability, and helps us avoid the error-prone biased decisions that can come from automatic ‘fast thinking’.

Director of St James Ethics Centre, Dr Simon Longstaff, has said ‘the greatest pressure on modern leaders is the absence of time to stop and think’. That’s something we hear time and time again, and it can be helpful for leaders to remember we all have a choice to call a ‘time out’, however brief it might be.

While seeking feedback from others is essential, some leaders go further by appointing a ‘devil’s advocate’ in meetings to normalise challenge. It’s important to rotate the devil’s advocate too.

One CEO we know routinely tells colleagues that ‘you have an obligation to disagree with me’ to reduce confirmation and sunflower bias.

It’s also important to think about basic things such as where you hold meetings and who gets invited. Decision making experts emphasise the importance of hearing from people who are ‘cognitively peripheral’ – who have information that is not generally known – rather than having discussions with people who share similar knowledge. 

As you make a key decision, ask the team if they’ve considered a range of different thinking approaches and credible alternatives, as well as unconscious biases that might impact their decision-making.

That’s why we suggest using different communication channels to receive input on a project or idea. Some team members will probably be more comfortable providing an alternative view in a follow up email or direct phone call rather than in a team meeting.

HR leaders can track employee perceptions of opportunities to contribute to decision-making and speak up through annual or pulse engagement surveys – that’s a valuable contribution to business success.

Q: Do experts on diversity always get it right?

If only! For a start, we’re human so we’re prone to biases just as anyone else is.

Adapting to different thinking and learning styles is challenging for us too.

Recently a client asked us to facilitate a workshop for senior leaders in a range of locations around the world. We were reticent, as our preference is face-to-face learning to build conversations. But we decided to give it a go, asking one of our team members used to working in virtual global operating environments to help us re-design content.

We ended up with some new tools and our client reach has now extended from Melbourne to Mongolia!


 

Contact Diversity Partners at info@diversitypartners.com.au or phone us on 1800 571 999 if you'd like to talk through ways to progress diversity and inclusion in your firm this year.

To read the original interview with Peoplecorp Recruitment Specialists, please see: http://www.peoplecorp.com.au/hr-spotlight/interview-dr-katie-spearritt-ceo-diversity-partners/

Diversity contributes to better ethical practices

Ethics

Leading and sustaining a successful and ethical business can be a complex game. For some, this can be all the more (seemingly) complex when you bring together people with different backgrounds and perspectives.

However, we now know that well-managed diverse teams lead to greater business benefits, innovation and creativity.

Where some are still connecting the dots is in understanding the positive impact of diverse teams and inclusive behaviours on ethical decision-making and corporate governance. 

Several studies have shown that diversity on boards and in teams brings fresh thinking, increased focus on problem solving, and greater transparency.

As companies plan leadership curriculums for 2018, we think a significant focus on the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making and problem-solving is warranted.

dynamics make a difference

 It's important for leaders to understand the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making.    

 It's important for leaders to understand the value of diversity (of background and thinking approaches) in ethical decision-making. 

 

People with different backgrounds bring new information, but what really counts is the dynamics of diverse teams when making decisions.

In a seminal article published in Scientific American, Professor Katherine Phillips from Columbia Business School writes that 'interacting with individuals who are different forces group members to prepare better, to anticipate alternative viewpoints and to expect that reaching consensus will take effort'.

'When we hear dissent from someone who is different to us, it provokes more thought than when it comes from someone who looks like us,' she says.

It's these behavioural dynamics that drive ethical successes and failures, argues Dennis Gentilin, author of The Origins of Ethical Failures and publicly named ‘whistleblower’ in the FX trading scandal that rocked the National Australia Bank in 2004.

Speaking with us at Diversity Partners, Gentilin says 'we need to surround ourselves with diverse opinions to keep ourselves accountable to our standards and values because we can all fall short.'

‘If we surround ourselves with challenging views and create an environment where others feel they can ‘speak up’ then we avoid going down the slippery slope of ethical failure,’ according to Gentilin.

Unfortunately, sometimes it takes a crisis for organisations to fully understand and appreciate the contribution of good diversity and inclusion practices to ethical resilience.

In 2011, one year after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, I joined a global facilitation team for BP’s newly formed Diversity & Inclusion Academy. As a result of this crisis, and following a range of independent studies on the situation, it became clear that decision-making biases (particularly confirmation bias) and the lack of a safety ‘speak up’ culture were among contributing factors to the disaster.

BP subsequently focused on leadership education so that all employees act with greater awareness of core values such as safety, respect and courage, and have awareness and skills to challenge unconscious biases.

Tips to encourage diverse thinking approaches and perspectives

Although we’re all susceptible to forces that make us ignore risks, leaders at all levels of an organisation can take steps that will encourage diversity of thought and potentially reduce ethical risk.

Here's a few tips to get started...

            1. Develop your awareness of cognitive biases. Psychologists and behavioural economists have highlighted many biases that impair our ability to make objective and effective decisions. We all have biases, but we’re often not aware of them playing out in our minds.

Unconscious bias training gives leaders an opportunity to understand how easily our decisions are impacted at work by affinity bias (our natural tendency to gravitate towards ‘people like us’), confirmation bias (our tendency to seek out information that confirms our beliefs and ignore conflicting evidence), and groupthink (where pressure for unanimity overwhelms realistic appraisal of alternative courses of action).

            2. Give teams explicit permission to disagree with you. While seeking feedback from others is essential, some leaders go further by appointing a ‘devil’s advocate’ in meetings to encourage multiple perspectives and normalise challenge. One CEO we know routinely tells colleagues that ‘you have an obligation to disagree with me’.

            3. Engage team members from outside of your regular circle. Inclusive leaders make a concerted effort to understand the experiences of people who are not part of their tight-knit ‘in-group’ and who may feel (unintentionally) excluded from some key decisions.

Simple things such as where you hold meetings and who gets invited to them can make a difference.

Decision making experts emphasise the importance of hearing from people who are ‘cognitively peripheral’ – who have information that is not generally known – rather than having discussions disproportionately influenced by people who are ‘cognitively central’ – who have knowledge that is shared by many members of the group.

Or, as one global organisation advises its leaders, every group needs to ‘hear from the quietest person in the room’.


An earlier version of this article appeared in Leadership Matters, the newsletter of the Institute of Managers and Leaders for Australia and New Zealand in 2016.

If you'd like more information about this topic, or any other resources to help progress diversity and inclusion in your firm, please email us at info@diversitypartners.com.au.