Recruitment

Rethinking recruitment

Patty McCord, Netflix's former head of talent, was recently in Australia talking about overturning traditional approaches to recruitment and diversity was a key underpinning of her message.

Instead of thinking about the person we want to hire, McCord says a better approach is to think about the problem you want to solve. This approach helps us move beyond hiring the same people over and over again who are like us (called affinity bias) and become more receptive to different opinions and perspectives. It helps meet the diversity of customer needs too.

Are you really hiring the best person for the job? Rethink recruitment to access talent from diverse talent pools.  Photo: Getty Images

Are you really hiring the best person for the job? Rethink recruitment to access talent from diverse talent pools.

Photo: Getty Images

There's another reason why we think rethinking recruitment to focus on the problem needing to be solved, as McCord recommends, is important. The benefit of this approach is that it helps us avoid associations with the current incumbent.

Given that the gender of the person currently doing the role will influence who is seen as most suitable for it, as business psychologists such as Professor Binna Kandola have shown, it's all too easy to overlook candidates from different backgrounds.

 

McCord is also well known for highlighting the risks of hiring for 'cultural fit', as she stated in Harvard Business Review earlier this year. 

'What most people really mean when they say someone is a good fit culturally is that he or she is someone they’d like to have a beer with. But people with all sorts of personalities can be great at the job you need done. This misguided hiring strategy can also contribute to a company’s lack of diversity, since very often the people we enjoy hanging out with have backgrounds much like our own.’

Like McCord, we think it's important to challenge affinity bias, as well as other biases that can impact hiring such as halo effect, confirmation bias and priming. Going a step further, we recommend hiring managers understand implicit gender and cultural stereotyping that inhibits diversity in organisations.

That's why we've created workshops for hiring managers (and recruitment specialists) and a leader conversation guide called 'Recruiting Fairly and Objectively: Challenging Unconscious Bias in Recruitment'. 

In our two-hour workshops, leaders learn several ways to promote diversity and reduce bias in each stage of the recruitment process, from the decision to search internally or externally, job advertising, shortlisting, interviewing to on-boarding. 

We explain the value of de-identifying CVs, avoiding gendered language, advertising in diverse channels, clear selection criteria and consistency of process.

As many of us know, too much hiring manager discretion increases the potential for subjectivity, inconsistency and bias.

We think it's also important to include an 'inclusion competency' in job and selection criteria. This aligns with broader company efforts to promote inclusion in leadership behaviours, practices and policies.

To assess a candidate's inclusion competency, you might ask for example:

  • Have you worked with others from diverse backgrounds and with different experiences? What were the challenges and benefits of that diversity?
  • How have you handled a situation when a colleague or a direct report was not accepting of others’ background, values, or experiences?
  • Can you share examples of how you've encouraged different perspectives in your team meetings in the past?

All of these techniques offer a way to rethink recruitment more rigorously and objectively, and advance diversity and inclusion progress in organisations more generally. And that brings a range of benefits such as increased innovation, better problem solving, and access to broader talent pools.

If you'd like more information about our recruitment workshops, conversation guide, or would like to chat about your company's particular needs, please call us on 1800 571 999 or email info@diversitypartners.com.au. We'd love to hear from you.

 

Building our team capability - welcoming Grazia Pecoraro

We talk a lot about building leader capability with our clients, and over the past year we've been building our own team capability and diversity of background.

Grazia Pecoraro joined Diversity Partners last year, bringing years of corporate experience in leading diversity and inclusion initiatives, a background in communications, and plenty of energy to the job.

Grazia Pecoraro

Grazia Pecoraro

Based in Sydney, Grazia has already delivered a range of solutions to help our clients achieve diversity progress.

As well as working across the broad diversity and inclusion agenda, Grazia’s specialties are in strategy development, implementation of flexible working practices, and initiatives to support people with disability.

We asked Grazia a few questions about her background and commitment to diversity and inclusion.

What led you to work in the diversity and inclusion space?

Growing up in South Africa during the height of the Apartheid era and living with a sight impairment of being legally blind without my glasses, has heightened my awareness of difference, identity and inclusion (and left me with a life-long quirk of referring to traffic lights as ‘robots’!). My background is in Communications, Reputation Management and Public Relations and I started out my career working for clients such as Apple, Microsoft, IBM and Cisco in South Africa and Australia.

FIve years after working in Westpac Group as an Internal Communications Manager, I volunteered for the then-new ABLE Employee Action Group that champions inclusion for people with disability. That was almost six years ago and I can truly say that every day I learn something new in this space as there are so many intersecting facets relating to human behaviour, change and beliefs.

 

What are you most enjoying about working with the DP team?

Being part of the Diversity Partners team has allowed me to get a broader diversity of experience - our clients span multiple industries, sectors and range in size.

I’ve already worked on projects for clients in emergency services, environment support, infrastructure, marketing, pharmaceutical, healthcare and energy. It’s fantastic to access a ‘hive mind’ of consultants with a range of experiences and thinking styles, so our clients get the best outcomes possible.

Joining a consultancy with an outstanding reputation, excellent practices and a number of innovative inclusion products has meant that I can focus on what I’m passionate about – delivering meaningful diversity outcomes to a broad range of organisations so that collectively, we shape and change Australia for the better.

 

What were some of the highlights of your career at Westpac?

There were many standout moments but for me these are the ones I reflect on most often:

·      Winning Gail Kelly’s Westpac CEO Award in 2010 for my work in championing sustainability and environmental initiatives in our business including bringing Keep Cups into all internal cafes.

·      Being selected as a Jawun business mentoring participant and spending 5 weeks supporting Aboriginal communities in Cape York.

·      Accepting the 2016 Australian Human Rights Award on behalf of Westpac for the leading-edge, ‘intuitively inclusive and accessible’ design of the new Barangaroo Campus in Sydney.

·      Winning the 2013 Australian Government’s National Disability Award for programs such as the Breaking Down the Barriers training I’d developed with Westpac’s ABLE Employee Action Group.

·      Rolling out programs of work to support the bank's aspirational target of having 50% of women in leadership by 2017.

 

If you’d like to speak with us about ways we can help your organization progress diversity, please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au and we’ll organise a call with you. 

Developing a commercially-responsive Diversity and Inclusion strategy in 2018

In 2017, Diversity Partners undertook 20 diagnostic and strategy engagements to set the course for action to achieve more diverse and inclusive workplaces in Australia and New Zealand. These engagements have been for a range of organisations, including top ASX firms, local subsidiaries of global firms, public sector agencies, and emergency services providers. 

Setting the course for diversity and inclusion progress needs a methodical approach.

Setting the course for diversity and inclusion progress needs a methodical approach.

We've also reviewed the talent management policies for a number of organisations to reduce the potential for unconscious bias and diversify talent pools.

Here we share five insights from our experiences in co-developing strategies with clients this year.

Five Insights

  1. Developing a diversity and inclusion strategy is an opportunity to clearly articulate how the  selected actions will advance organisational priorities, align with values and behaviours, meet customer needs, and help create the cultural change we all want to see in workplaces.
  2. Among leading organisations, the outcomes typically go beyond achieving certain demographic targets (e.g. percentage of women in leadership) to meaningful measures correlating levels of inclusion with innovation and productivity metrics. For example, resources giant BHP has quantified the benefits, finding that 'our most diverse sites outperform the company average on many measures, such as lower injury rates, and greater adherence to work plans and production targets,' according to CEO Andrew Mackenzie.
  3. A robust D & I strategy is not an easily templated strategy. It's a carefully considered plan that addresses specific organisational challenges and biases, demographic gaps, and policy shortfalls.
  4. Governance matters. It might seem simplistic, but it's really important to spell out who has responsibility for what, including the role of a diversity steering committee if one exists.
  5. Being realistic about plans for year one, two, and three keeps the momentum going.
  6. Linking internal efforts with external efforts (e.g. corporate social responsibility initiatives) helps stakeholders to make deeper connections about the value of diversity and inclusion.

One of our longer-term strategy engagements this year was with the Bureau of Meteorology, resulting in the launch of their Gender Equality Plan in October. Chief Scientist and Group Executive Science & Innovation, Dr Sue Barrell, recently shared her feedback on the partnership:

"We started our journey by engaging Diversity Partners to research challenges and opportunities for us. Their research was extremely thorough, drawing on inputs from hundreds of team members and a range of data points relating to recruitment, retention, flexibility usage, and promotion. From this, we worked with Diversity Partners to develop a comprehensive action plan.
This has been an exemplary partnership and we acknowledge the commitment, professionalism and passion of the team who worked closely with us, our ‘friends’ on this journey."

With the ever-growing focus on diversity and inclusion in the community and in workplaces comes a responsibility to set well-crafted, commercially-savvy strategies with tangible actions and accountability to drive progress. That's a responsibility we take very seriously at Diversity Partners.

 

Please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au if you'd like to discuss ways we can work with you to advance your organisation's diversity and inclusion efforts in 2018.

 

Tackling unconscious bias: changing processes and mindsets

While unconscious bias training gets a lot of focus as a way to advance diversity and inclusion, it’s important to remember the most effective approach is a tailored and comprehensive one that doesn’t just focus on changing mindsets.

Working from the premise that ‘it’s easier to change your processes than your people', Iris Bohnet from Harvard Kennedy School encourages companies to redesign their processes to prevent biased choices and encourage greater diversity in the first place.

As Bohnet says: ‘Start by accepting that our minds are stubborn beasts. It’s very hard to eliminate our biases, but we can design organisations to make it easier for our biased minds to get things right.’[1]

That’s why, in our consulting work, we focus on both hard-wiring diversity and inclusion principles through re-designing organisational processes, and soft-wiring through leadership programs and education.

In our consulting work we focus on both hard-wiring diversity and inclusion principles through re-designing organisational processes, and soft-wiring through leadership programs and education.
— Dr Katie Spearritt

We often review recruitment, succession planning, and promotion policies and outcomes to determine whether unconscious biases are impacting decisions. We revise job descriptions and advertisements to ensure they have a mix of words typically associated with male and female characteristics, to attract a diverse talent pool.

We also work with clients to develop diversity goals and dashboards to track the objectives they set out to achieve.

How one company is embedding change

Adapting site facilities and re-designing processes to anticipate greater diversity. Photo: Getty Images.

Adapting site facilities and re-designing processes to anticipate greater diversity. Photo: Getty Images.

A good example of the combined approach to process and mindset change comes from one of our clients – the project division of a global resources firm with whom we’ve partnered over the past year.

This is an organisation seriously committed to increasing diversity and improving inclusion across all sites.

A working group of business representatives drive the initiative, with the team meeting weekly (virtually, across a number of continents) to share challenges and progress.

Each meeting starts with a safety share, and an inclusion and diversity share.

Some of the tangible steps the team has taken over the past six months include:

  • Refreshing induction and recruitment processes to reduce bias
  • Creating new employment brand visuals, including new posters and graphics in offices to reflect greater diversity
  • Setting meaningful targets for a more inclusive work environment and greater demographic diversity across their operations, and
  • Developing new infrastructure guidelines to design more inclusive mine/project site facilities.
You can’t be what you can’t see.

The guidelines for upgrading or designing new facilities build on the simple notion that ‘you can’t be what you can’t see’ – in other words, adapt our facilities now to anticipate greater diversity.

The guidelines include facilities to improve gender inclusion, accessibility, and spaces to support employees to meet diverse religious, cultural and spiritual needs. Provisions for flexible working arrangements are there too.

These inclusive design principles will be familiar to those working in financial and professional services firms, but they’re far less common in traditional resources or manufacturing organisations in Australia. In fact, they remain challenging concepts for many, given the historically male-dominated Anglo workforces. 

Along with these tangible changes, leaders have taken part in education programs to build inclusive leadership capability and reduce bias - the soft-wiring that's part of building awareness and driving behavioural change.

The progress that's already occurring across this operation is evidence of the value of a mix of initiatives, tailored to the organisation’s specific challenges.  

We're reminded of the advice from global consulting firm McKinsey on diversity and inclusion: ‘There is no single way to make change happen; companies need a whole ecosystem of measures’[2].

 

Katie Spearritt is CEO of Diversity Partners. For more information on our services, please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au.


Did you know?

  • The gender of the people currently doing the role will influence who is seen as most suitable for it

  • Where someone behaves in a stereotype-inconsistent way, they will be less likely to be hired or promoted.

Source: Binna and Jo Kandola, The Invention of Difference: the story of gender bias at work, 2013


References

[1] Iris Bohnet points to the well-known example of behavioural re-design when orchestras started having musicians audition behind a curtain, making gender invisible. This simple change helped to increase the fraction of women in US orchestras from less than 10 per cent in the 1970s to almost 40 per cent today. Interview with Iris Bohnet by Gardiner Morse, 'Designing a Bias-Free Organisation', Harvard Business Review, July/August 2016.

[2] McKinsey Insights, ‘Moving mind-sets on gender diversity: McKinsey Global Survey Results’, January 2014. (http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/organization/our-insights/moving-mind-sets-on-gender-diversity-mckinsey-global-survey-results)

Are you really recruiting the best person for the job? Challenging unconscious bias

We know leaders mean well when they share with us that they always hire the ‘best person for the job’.

And we know it can be unsettling when they learn that there are all sorts of hidden biases – unconscious biases – that can impact our decision-making about who is the best person for the job, among many other decisions we make everyday in business.

There’s now extensive research from the fields of business psychology and neuroscience to show we are all biased, even though we like to think that we always apply logic and reason in our decision-making. The reality is we all have these biases so ingrained we hardly notice them.

That’s why we find it useful in our consulting work to highlight a range of cognitive biases that impact decision-making and inhibit diversity progress. It’s powerful when the examples come from leaders in our workshops, particularly when they reflect on what perspectives may have been missed when making key decisions due to affinity bias, groupthink, and sunflower bias among others.

We also draw on research like the study by Yale University social psychologist, John Bargh, in which subjects primed with the concept of the 'elderly' while doing a simple task later walked more slowly when leaving the experiment than subjects in the control group who read words that were not related to the elderly.

Having bias isn’t bad – it’s natural. We naturally gravitate to people who are like us – it’s called affinity bias – particularly in social situations. We like to have our views confirmed rather than challenged (confirmation bias) and groups in the workplace have a tendency to align with the views of leaders, especially when the boss speaks up first (sunflower management).

Having bias isn’t bad - it’s natural.

But this becomes a problem in the workplace when subtle biases and stereotypes associated with different demographic groups lead us to overlook or unintentionally exclude some people and groups in the workplace.

We've compiled some practical tips for leaders to reduce the potential for unconscious bias when recruiting and ensure decision-making is genuinely fair and objective.

We've framed these tips as ‘when-then’ statements because psychologists have shown that having a specific and tangible intention plan is more likely to lead to behavioural change. Put simply, it's about creating 'instant habits' to help us reach our goals. In her 2014 HBR Spotlight article, social psychologist Heidi Grant says that if-then planning increases the likelihood of individuals reaching their goals by 300%.

By making ourselves aware of the possibility for bias, and by taking a simple action, we can reduce (and in some cases even eliminate) unconscious bias.

Our team has compiled a few tips:

When you’re preparing your job advertisement, then …

  • Proof read your role advertisements with a diversity lens to ensure the language is inclusive. It’s important that descriptions have a mix of words associated with male and female characteristics to attract a diverse talent pool. Words such as 'dominant' and 'competitive' have a masculine connotation'; words such as 'committed', 'interpersonal' have a feminine connotation.

When you’re briefing a recruiter or agency, then …

  • Share your expectation of receiving the broadest possible candidate pool. Ask recruiters to provide you with gender-balanced and culturally diverse shortlists for management roles. Explain that you would like them to focus on seeking a range of diverse skills and experience.

When you’re preparing to shortlist candidates, then …

  • Consider receiving the shortlisted CVs as 'blind CVs' with references to gender, age, disability and ethnicity removed. This will ensure you assess each candidate fairly against the requirements of the role and have a diverse mix of talent in your candidate pool.
  • Ask candidates if they have any special requirements for the interview (these may include access requirements to the interview premises, resource or support requirements).

When you’re setting up a selection panel, then …

  • Ensure you ask a diverse group of leaders to sit on the panel, including at least one male and female representative of equal decision making authority. Train those leaders to recognise unconscious biases and encourage them to provide feedback to each other.

When you’re interviewing, then …

  • Focus on the candidate’s skills, experience and knowledge.
  • Use competency-based questions that relate to the inherent role requirements and ensure everyone is assessed on the same questions.
  • Give every candidate the same amount of time so they have equal opportunity to demonstrate their strengths.
  • Appreciate benefits of diversity of thought in team make up.
  • Give adequate time to the process. Stress, time pressures, and cognitive overload can exacerbate our unconscious biases.

And a final crucial point …

  • When finalising the remuneration package, ensure there is no gender pay inequality.

If you'd like to know more about our programs to help reduce bias in decision-making, please call us on 0429 185 700 or email info@diversitypartners.com.au

 

Cognitive biases muddy our decision making. We rely too heavily on intuitive, automatic judgements, and even when we try to use reason, our logic is often lazy or flawed.
— Jack B. Soll, Katherine L. Milkman, and John W. Payne, 'Outsmart Your Own Biases', Harvard Business Review, May 2015