Diagnostics

Uncovering the real inclusion challenges and opportunities 

Photo by Sezeryadigar/iStock / Getty Images

Photo by Sezeryadigar/iStock / Getty Images

When developing a diversity and inclusion strategy, we can’t stress enough how important it is to listen to the views of employees, leaders and other key stakeholders, particularly on organisational challenges and opportunities. 

Having an independent external vendor conduct this research through a diversity diagnostic not only helps to uncover organisational biases and outdated practices that inhibit progress, but also gives the organisation a path forward to overcome them, based on best practice evidence.

Over the past decade, our team at Diversity Partners has conducted diversity diagnostics and developed strategies with more than 50 organisations, involving thousands of people through interviews and focus groups. That’s taken us to diverse places around Australia and New Zealand – from mine sites, factory floors, creative agency offices, to trading rooms and boardrooms. 

 The goal of the diagnostic is to deliver a clear picture of the inclusion and diversity challenges and opportunities that then inform the D & I strategy. Our diagnostics also help articulate the specific benefits of achieving greater diversity and inclusion for the business, which builds engagement and willingness to take action.

We often add a survey to the qualitative information we collect. That ensures we’re capturing the voices of as many people as possible. As part of the diagnostic, we identify any structural barriers through a thorough analysis of talent management data and policies.

It’s a robust process, conducted sensitively and confidentially. And it gives organisations the type of robust data and evidence they would typically use to approach any major strategic decision. 

The diversity diagnostic is a robust process, conducted sensitively and confidentially. And it gives organisations the type of robust data and evidence they would typically use to approach any major strategic decision.
— Dr Katie Spearritt

At the moment, our team is working with a large global resources company to help align their diversity goals with the strategic objectives of the Australian operations and recommend a way forward for the next years.

This substantive diagnostic has reminded us that it’s not only the outcome of the research that’s valuable, but the process of getting there. The people participating in interviews and focus groups have consistently said how much they value the opportunity to share their views of cultural and structural barriers, and the type of inclusive work environment they want to work in. 

 Approaching diversity and inclusion as a core strategic issue from the start – through a diversity diagnostic - helps set the framework for a carefully-crafted strategy with appropriate metrics and governance. 

We’ve undertaken diagnostics and co-developed inclusion and diversity strategies for organisations such as Anglo American Metallurgical Coal, Bendigo & Adelaide Bank, BHP, the Bureau of Meteorology, Commonwealth Bank, Computershare, ExxonMobil, Golder Associates, Lander & Rogers, Maddocks, ME Bank, Rio Tinto, Suncorp, Telstra Super, Transpower NZ, QSuper, Unity Water, and state government departments.

 Here’s a selection of feedback on the value of that diagnostic work.

Diversity Partners undertook thorough research to identify ways Telstra Super could accelerate our diversity and inclusion progress and achieve the associated benefits for our people and members. In the two years since this initial diagnostic, we’ve implemented a range of their recommendations, including the review of key people policies and practices such as recruitment, flexible work, gender pay analysis and unconscious bias training and implemented a number of awareness raising initiatives.

Our commitment to diversity and inclusion has resulted in an improved employee experience and an environment that genuinely supports the requirement for our people to flourish at work. We appreciated the rigour and objectivity of their feedback and recommendations to help set and refresh our course and value our ongoing partnership with the DP team.’
— Janet Brown, EGM People and Culture, Telstra Super:
The Bureau of Meteorology has taken great steps forward this year to build a more diverse and inclusive culture, and recently launched our first Gender Equality Plan. We started our journey by engaging Diversity Partners to research challenges and opportunities for us.

Their research was extremely thorough, drawing on inputs from hundreds of team members and a range of data points relating to recruitment, retention, flexibility usage, and promotion. From this, we worked with Diversity Partners to develop a comprehensive action plan.
— Dr Sue Barrell, former Chief Scientist, Bureau of Meteorology
Diversity Partners has worked in complete partnership with us from day one. They guided us every step of the way through the diagnostic and benchmarking process and delivered a high quality strategy.
— Paul Lundy, Chief of People & Transformation, Super

Getting diversity on the radar

If there’s one website most of us rely on daily, it’s the Bureau of Meteorology. The Bureau provides information, forecasts, services and research relating to weather, climate and water to Australians everywhere.

The Bureau has a proud history – it has been in operation for more than 100 years - and today employs around 1,600 staff to deliver these essential services.

Historically, the Bureau has been a male-dominated organisation. During the 1970s and 1980s, historian David Day observed the Bureau aspired to ‘strict impartiality’ between male and female applicants. But few women held leadership positions, and proposals for women to take on observer roles at weather stations were met with resistance.  

Fast forward to 2018 and a concerted effort to progress gender equality and diversity, led by the CEO and executive team, has seen some impressive steps forward.

This follows an extensive diagnostic process Diversity Partners led for the Bureau at the beginning of 2017. Through interviews, focus groups, and data analysis, we identified ways to accelerate progress towards gender equality. 

We talked to people at all levels across all states, and reviewed pipelines for hiring and succession to come up with key actions – some immediate, some longer-term.  We then worked closely with key stakeholders to develop the Bureau’s Gender Equality Plan, launched in October 2017, and Diversity & Inclusion Commitment. 

Since then, as part of an implementation phase, the Bureau has held workshops for leaders and provided resources for hiring managers to recruit fairly and objectively. It's now closer to that ‘strict impartiality’ in hiring and promotion processes, as awareness of. unconscious bias is much higher.

The results are encouraging. At the beginning of 2017, as we began the diagnostic process, the gender composition of the Bureau’s workforce was 30% females. It’s now 34%.

The percentage of women in senior leadership (SES and EL2U) increased from 28% (as at June 2017) to 31% (June 2018) and the percentage of women in STEM is up from 26% to 28%.

The Bureau’s Diversity & Inclusion Statement is a key component of the Gender Equality Action Plan and is now visibly displayed in head office and regional offices throughout the country.

‘The Bureau strives to be the model of an inclusive culture where diversity of thought and background is valued. This provides better outcomes for our people, customers and the Australian community.’

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The statement has four key commitments:

·       developing and promoting an equitable, respectful and inclusive workplace culture where our people are engaged, are valued for their uniqueness and feel they belong; 

·       bringing together people with different backgrounds and ways of thinking, which helps drive better decision-making, innovation and overall performance; 

·       ensuring we recruit from the broadest talent pool, reflective of our customers and the communities with which we work; and 

·       supporting the use of flexible work arrangements at all levels to enable our people to balance their personal and professional commitments. 

The Bureau of Meteorology's progress shows what can be achieved when a comprehensive and rigorous approach is taken, involving everyone from senior leaders and front-line employees. It shows the value of setting metrics and conducting regular reviews. 

And it highlights the importance of connecting diversity and inclusion efforts to the values, services and customers of one of Australia’s most important organisations.

 

Source: David Day, The Weather Watchers: 100 Years of the Bureau of Meteorology, 2007.

Building our team capability - welcoming Grazia Pecoraro

We talk a lot about building leader capability with our clients, and over the past year we've been building our own team capability and diversity of background.

Grazia Pecoraro joined Diversity Partners last year, bringing years of corporate experience in leading diversity and inclusion initiatives, a background in communications, and plenty of energy to the job.

Grazia Pecoraro

Grazia Pecoraro

Based in Sydney, Grazia has already delivered a range of solutions to help our clients achieve diversity progress.

As well as working across the broad diversity and inclusion agenda, Grazia’s specialties are in strategy development, implementation of flexible working practices, and initiatives to support people with disability.

We asked Grazia a few questions about her background and commitment to diversity and inclusion.

What led you to work in the diversity and inclusion space?

Growing up in South Africa during the height of the Apartheid era and living with a sight impairment of being legally blind without my glasses, has heightened my awareness of difference, identity and inclusion (and left me with a life-long quirk of referring to traffic lights as ‘robots’!). My background is in Communications, Reputation Management and Public Relations and I started out my career working for clients such as Apple, Microsoft, IBM and Cisco in South Africa and Australia.

FIve years after working in Westpac Group as an Internal Communications Manager, I volunteered for the then-new ABLE Employee Action Group that champions inclusion for people with disability. That was almost six years ago and I can truly say that every day I learn something new in this space as there are so many intersecting facets relating to human behaviour, change and beliefs.

 

What are you most enjoying about working with the DP team?

Being part of the Diversity Partners team has allowed me to get a broader diversity of experience - our clients span multiple industries, sectors and range in size.

I’ve already worked on projects for clients in emergency services, environment support, infrastructure, marketing, pharmaceutical, healthcare and energy. It’s fantastic to access a ‘hive mind’ of consultants with a range of experiences and thinking styles, so our clients get the best outcomes possible.

Joining a consultancy with an outstanding reputation, excellent practices and a number of innovative inclusion products has meant that I can focus on what I’m passionate about – delivering meaningful diversity outcomes to a broad range of organisations so that collectively, we shape and change Australia for the better.

 

What were some of the highlights of your career at Westpac?

There were many standout moments but for me these are the ones I reflect on most often:

·      Winning Gail Kelly’s Westpac CEO Award in 2010 for my work in championing sustainability and environmental initiatives in our business including bringing Keep Cups into all internal cafes.

·      Being selected as a Jawun business mentoring participant and spending 5 weeks supporting Aboriginal communities in Cape York.

·      Accepting the 2016 Australian Human Rights Award on behalf of Westpac for the leading-edge, ‘intuitively inclusive and accessible’ design of the new Barangaroo Campus in Sydney.

·      Winning the 2013 Australian Government’s National Disability Award for programs such as the Breaking Down the Barriers training I’d developed with Westpac’s ABLE Employee Action Group.

·      Rolling out programs of work to support the bank's aspirational target of having 50% of women in leadership by 2017.

 

If you’d like to speak with us about ways we can help your organization progress diversity, please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au and we’ll organise a call with you. 

Developing a commercially-responsive Diversity and Inclusion strategy in 2018

In 2017, Diversity Partners undertook 20 diagnostic and strategy engagements to set the course for action to achieve more diverse and inclusive workplaces in Australia and New Zealand. These engagements have been for a range of organisations, including top ASX firms, local subsidiaries of global firms, public sector agencies, and emergency services providers. 

Setting the course for diversity and inclusion progress needs a methodical approach.

Setting the course for diversity and inclusion progress needs a methodical approach.

We've also reviewed the talent management policies for a number of organisations to reduce the potential for unconscious bias and diversify talent pools.

Here we share five insights from our experiences in co-developing strategies with clients this year.

Five Insights

  1. Developing a diversity and inclusion strategy is an opportunity to clearly articulate how the  selected actions will advance organisational priorities, align with values and behaviours, meet customer needs, and help create the cultural change we all want to see in workplaces.
  2. Among leading organisations, the outcomes typically go beyond achieving certain demographic targets (e.g. percentage of women in leadership) to meaningful measures correlating levels of inclusion with innovation and productivity metrics. For example, resources giant BHP has quantified the benefits, finding that 'our most diverse sites outperform the company average on many measures, such as lower injury rates, and greater adherence to work plans and production targets,' according to CEO Andrew Mackenzie.
  3. A robust D & I strategy is not an easily templated strategy. It's a carefully considered plan that addresses specific organisational challenges and biases, demographic gaps, and policy shortfalls.
  4. Governance matters. It might seem simplistic, but it's really important to spell out who has responsibility for what, including the role of a diversity steering committee if one exists.
  5. Being realistic about plans for year one, two, and three keeps the momentum going.
  6. Linking internal efforts with external efforts (e.g. corporate social responsibility initiatives) helps stakeholders to make deeper connections about the value of diversity and inclusion.

One of our longer-term strategy engagements this year was with the Bureau of Meteorology, resulting in the launch of their Gender Equality Plan in October. Chief Scientist and Group Executive Science & Innovation, Dr Sue Barrell, recently shared her feedback on the partnership:

"We started our journey by engaging Diversity Partners to research challenges and opportunities for us. Their research was extremely thorough, drawing on inputs from hundreds of team members and a range of data points relating to recruitment, retention, flexibility usage, and promotion. From this, we worked with Diversity Partners to develop a comprehensive action plan.
This has been an exemplary partnership and we acknowledge the commitment, professionalism and passion of the team who worked closely with us, our ‘friends’ on this journey."

With the ever-growing focus on diversity and inclusion in the community and in workplaces comes a responsibility to set well-crafted, commercially-savvy strategies with tangible actions and accountability to drive progress. That's a responsibility we take very seriously at Diversity Partners.

 

Please contact us at info@diversitypartners.com.au if you'd like to discuss ways we can work with you to advance your organisation's diversity and inclusion efforts in 2018.

 

Uncovering the real diversity challenges and impacts

When organisations first contact us, some have a clear idea of the challenges they’re trying to address, such as a lack of cultural diversity or gender balance at leadership levels, or concerning levels of inclusion reported through engagement surveys.

What are less clear are the reasons behind these challenges, and how best to drive progress.

That’s why we recommend a ‘discovery’ process that identifies the cultural and structural barriers getting in the way of diversity progress and overall firm performance.

Organisations can then push forward confidently with a bespoke diversity and inclusion strategy and action plans.

The research we undertake for many clients includes a detailed analysis of existing policies, current demographics, external benchmarking, together with employee views captured through interviews and focus groups. We draw on global benchmarks and local industry knowledge to recommend appropriate solutions.

Recent diagnostics have taken us from mine sites to boardrooms around Australia. We’ve interviewed CEO’s, senior managers, paramedics, IT specialists, engineers, meteorologists, digital media entrepreneurs, among others, to provide an assessment of diversity challenges and opportunities.

Uncovering new opportunities

It’s particularly interesting when diversity opportunities aren’t immediately obvious to our clients. Here’s a few examples where opportunities highlighted had an immediate impact on service delivery, product design and employee engagement.

  • A global financial services firm realised their marketing programs didn't adequately reflect the needs of their increasingly diverse consumer segments.
  • Another diagnostic highlighted an overwhelming need from employees for education about engaging with different cultural groups in the community so they could provide more targeted and culturally-sensitive services.
  • One organisation discovered that managers wanted much greater guidance and tools to effectively lead flexible teams.
  • In another firm, the diagnostic showed a significant difference between employee perceptions of biases and leadership views of how the firm was tracking on diversity. Employees were strongly concerned about perceived in-action by leadership.
A global financial services firm recognised their marketing programs didn't adequately reflect the needs of diverse consumer segments. Photo license: Getty Images.

A global financial services firm recognised their marketing programs didn't adequately reflect the needs of diverse consumer segments. Photo license: Getty Images.

 

If you’re wondering what initiatives will best progress your diversity and inclusion objectives, going back to the fundamentals of ‘what are we trying to achieve’ and ‘what problems are we trying to address’ is often the best step to achieve targeted and effective solutions.

 

What we're working on

The team at Diversity Partners has been working on several client engagements in the first quarter of 2017. Here's a sample:

  • Diversity diagnostics for emergency services organisations, resources firms, water utilities and government agencies;
  • ‘Inclusive Leadership: challenging unconscious bias’ programs for organisations in the transport, rail, mining, manufacturing, legal, and financial services sectors;
  • Flexibility programs and toolkits for financial services firms and Australian Government departments;
  • Facilitating D & I Councils for a media/advertising firm and rail operator;
  • Strategic partnership with a global mining company to advance the targeted objectives and metrics for a major division;
  • Cultural intelligence programs to build the cross-cultural communications and capability of employees in the transport sector.